Social Studies

social-studies

Staff:

Faculty Leader: Jessica Sutheran

Leader of Geography: Kim Crickmore

Leader of Health and Social Care: Benjamin Chester-Brown

Teacher of Geography: Sarah Coleman

Teacher of Geography: John Child

Teacher of Geography: Elizabeth Mallett

Teacher of Geography: Alex Handy

Teacher of Social Studies: Jack Pegler

Teacher of Sociology: John Inman

GEOGRAPHY CURRICULUM

CURRICULUM – KEY STAGE 3

Year 7

What topics will I learn in Year 7 Geography?

Autumn Term 1 Introduction to Geography: Geographical skills
Autumn Term 2 Impossible Places
Spring Term 1 Cracking coasts: Coasts
Spring Term 2 Geography of me
Summer Term 1 Finding Nemo enquiry
Summer Term 2 Rich vs. Poor

What Field Visits will I go on in Year 7 Geography?

In the summer term students are given the opportunity to visit the Sea Life centre in Birmingham to help them with their Finding Nemo enquiry.

Year 8

Autumn Term 1 Brazil and the Olympics
Autumn Term 2 How are extreme Geographical events portrayed in the media?
Spring Term 1 Svalbard and Culture fair
Spring Term 2 Extreme weather
Summer Term 1 Population and migration enquiry
Summer Term 2 Geography of Health

What Field Visits will I go on in Year 8 Geography?

In the autumn term Year 8 students are given the opportunity to visit the London Olympic park to compare and contrast in to the Brazil Olympic park, enabling students to draw on the best of both to create their own Olympic park.

Year 9

In Year 9 Geography students get the chance to explore areas of the curriculum in more depth, in order to prepare them for the topics and discussions at GCSE.

These topics include:

  • Tectonic Hazards
  • China’s one child policy
  • Climate Change
  • Somalian Pirates
  • Syria and their civil war
  • Nigerian School girls
  • Blood Diamonds
  • Ecosystems

In the summer term students are given the opportunity to visit the West Midlands Safari park where they can hold and interact with some of the animals, to help support their ecosystems topics and how animals can adapt to their surroundings, this has strong links with the GCSE specification.

CURRICULUM – KEY STAGE 4

AQA GCSE Geography

What will I learn?

Unit 1: Living with the physical environment

Students will build upon their key stage 3 knowledge by exploring:

  • Tectonic hazards e.g. volcanoes and earthquakes
  • Weather hazards e.g. hurricanes
  • Climate change
  • Ecosystems
  • Tropical rainforest
  • Hot deserts
  • UK’s coast and rivers

Unit 2: challenges in the human environment

Students will build upon their key stage 3 knowledge by exploring:

  • The urban world
  • Urban change in the UK e.g. Birmingham
  • Urban sustainability
  • The development gap (HIC and LIC)
  • Nigeria as a newly emerging economy (NEE)
  • The changing UK economy
  • Resource and energy management

Unit 3: Geographical application and skills

Students will complete two field work experiences. They will use this along with pre-release material issued around 6 weeks before the exam to answer paper 3.

for further information on exam assessment please visit:

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/geography/gcse/geography-8035/specification-at-a-glance

What Field Visits will I go on in GCSE Geography?

Spring Year 10 – Students will visit Birmingham for the day and explore the redevelopment of the city and whether the locals are happy with it.

Autumn Year 11 – Carding Mill Valley: Students complete a day’s river study in the Shropshire countryside. Here they will collect data to be used for their controlled assessment.

CURRICULUM – KEY STAGE 5 – AS AND A LEVEL

AQA AS and A-level

AS GEOGRAPHY

Physical Geography:

  • Water and carbon cycles
  • Hazards

Human Geography:

Geography fieldwork investigation:

for further information on exam assessment please visit:

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/geography/as-and-a-level/geography-7036/specification-at-a-glance

FULL A2 COURSE

Physical geography

Human geography

Geography fieldwork investigation

  • Fieldwork CAT

for further information on exam assessment please visit:

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/geography/as-and-a-level/geography-7037/specification-at-a-glance

What Field Visits will I go on in GCE Geography?

Students are required to attend 4 days field work, 2 of which will be exploring regeneration in Birmingham and 2 exploring coastal processes in Norfolk.

SOCIOLOGY CURRICULUM

Sociology

Sociology is a social science that seeks to explore and explain society and social issues. Students will study a range of theories, structures, processes and issues that affect them and others in society. They will then go on to question for themselves different aspects of the social make-up of the UK. They will also be presented with opportunities to gain a wider understanding of the groups of people that make up Britain and the issues that affect them on a daily basis. Students will look at issues such as crime and deviance, education, mass media, family and social inequality and will consider question such as:

  • Why is there such a big divide between the rich and poor?
  • Who is most likely to succeed in education and why?
  • Who commits crime and why do they do it?
  • Does the media manipulate our views and indoctrinate us?

Students will study theories such as Marxism, Feminism and Functionalism and will take this further into A-level to consider other groups of sociologists such as Postmodernists and Neo- Marxists. These theories will give them perspectives to help answer some of the key questions and in which to gauge their own social perspective.

Students should also develop a range of important skills which will serve them both in their further academic study and in the workplace. The skills include empathy, collaboration, debating, understanding patterns, analysis of evidence and evaluation as they consider the strengths and weaknesses to arguments. They should also begin to make links between Sociology and other areas of study (particularly other social sciences such as Psychology).

Many of our GCSE students choose to continue Sociology at A-level and then into a Sociology or related subject degree.

Course overview

In years 10-11 GCSE students will follow the AQA course which comprises of:

4091: Unit 1 4092: Unit 2
Studying society

·         What is sociology?

·         How do we understand the languages that sociologists use?

·         What is a social structure?

·         What is a social process?

·         What is a social issue?

·         What is quantitative and qualitative research?

Education

·         Why do we have schools?

·         How do we measure educational success and failure?

·         What is the hidden curriculum?

·         What influences educational success beyond school?

·         Why is education a political issue?

 

Family

·         What is a family?

·         What is the conventional nuclear family?

·         Is marriage in decline?

·         What are the role relationships in the family and how do these change over time?

·         What are the alternatives to family?

Crime and Deviance

·         What is crime and deviance?

·         How do we measure the amount of criminal behaviour in society?

·         How do we explain criminal and deviant behaviour?

·         How do we attempt to control anti-social behaviour?

·         Who commits crime?

 

Mass media

·         What are the mass media?

·         Who owns the mass media?

·         What effect does the mass media have on society?

·         What are the media stereotypes?

·         What is the impact of the technological change?

 

Social inequality

·         What is social stratification?

·         What are life chances?

·         What barriers to achievement exist?

·         How is wealth distributed in Britain today?

·         What does it mean to be poor in Britain today?

 

 In year 12 AS Sociology students will follow the AQA course which comprises of:

Paper 1 – Education and methods in context Paper 2 – Family and research
·         Educational achievement and different social classes, genders and ethnic groups.

·         The function and purpose of the education system

·         Educational policy and inequality

·         Role of the education system

·         Internal and external factors

·         Researching education

·         The role of the family in society including Functionalism, Marxism, Feminism, The New Right

·         The nature of childhood.

·         Changes to the family, including divorce, marriage and cohabitation.

·         The domestic division of labour and power relationships

·         Demographic changes

·         Sociological perspectives on social policy

 

Sociological methods

·         How to use different research methods to investigate family and education.

·         Evaluation of such methods.

In yr 13 A-level students will be studying:

Paper 1: Education with theory and methods Paper 2: Topics in Sociology Paper 3: Crime and Deviance with theory and methods
Education

·         Educational achievement and different social classes, genders and ethnic groups.

·         The function and purpose of the education system

·         Educational policy and inequality

·         Role of the education system

·         Internal and external factors

·         Researching education

Family

·         The role of the family in society including Functionalism, Marxism, Feminism, The New Right

·         The nature of childhood.

·         Changes to the family, including divorce, marriage and cohabitation.

·         The domestic division of labour and power relationships

·         Demographic changes

·         Sociological perspectives on social policy

Beliefs in society

·         Theories of religion

·         Religion and social change

·         Secularisation

·         Religion, renewal and choice

·         Religion in a global context

·         Organisations, movements and members

·         Ideology and Science

Crime and Deviance

·         Functionalists, strain and subcultural

·         theories

·         Labelling theory and Interactionism

·         Marxists explanations for the cause of crime

·         in society

·         Realist theories on crime

·         Gender, crime and justice

·         Ethnicity, crime and justice

·         Crime and the media

·         Globalisation, green crime, human rights

·         and state crimes

·         Control punishment and victims

·         Suicide

Theory and methods

·         How to use different research methods

·         Evaluation of such methods.

·         Sociological theory

HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE CURRICULUM

Health and Social Care:

Health and Social Care is a practical vocational subject which aims to prepare students for a career in specific Health and Social settings. If students are considering a career in any health service (nursing, paramedic, elderly care, nursery nurse) or social care (social work, teaching) this subject will equipment them with essential skills for these careers.

The aims of the courses are to encourage candidates to:

  • Develop and sustain an interest in health, early-years care and education, social care and issues affecting the care sector
  • Acquire knowledge and understanding of health, early-years care and education and issues affecting the health and social care sector
  • Develop skills that will enable them to make an effective contribution to the care sector including skills of research, evaluation and problem-solving in a work related context
  • Apply knowledge, understanding and skills
  • Prepare for further study and training.

Course Overview:

Key stage four students have just started the new BTEC tech award and they will study:

Component 1 – Human life span development

How do people grow and develop through their lives? How can factors such as lifestyle choices and relationships affect this? Understanding these processes is essential knowledge and understanding for health and social care practitioners. In this component, you will study how people grow and develop over the course of their life, from infancy to old age, this includes physical, intellectual, emotional and social development, and the different factors that may affect them. An individual’s development can be affected by major life events, such as marriage, parenthood or moving house, and you will learn about how people adapt to these changes, as well as the types and sources of support that can help them. You will develop transferable skills, such as written communication skills, which will support your progression to Level 2 or 3 vocational or academic qualifications.

This component is assessed internally.

Component 2 – Health and social care services and values

At some point in your life you will need health care. It is likely that you have already had an appointment with a doctor. If you did, you are described as a ‘service user’. This means that you have been given health care from a person who was trained to give you care – they are called ‘service providers’. You might know someone who needs social care. This is different from health care, although both types of care are closely linked. People who need social care are not always ill – they may be unable to carry out everyday activities like getting dressed or feeding themselves, or they may need help with their day-to-day lives. Providing good health and social care services is very important and a set of ‘care values’ exists to ensure that this happens. Care values are important because they enable people who use health and social care services to get the care they need and to be protected from different sorts of harm. This component will give you an understanding of health and social care services and will help you develop skills in applying care values that are common across the sector (some of which are transferable to other sectors that involve interactions with clients or customers). This component will help you to progress to Level 1 or 2 vocational or academic qualifications.

This component is assessed internally.

Component 3 – Health and Wellbeing

What does being healthy actually mean? It can mean different things to different people: you might think ‘healthy’ is not having to visit the doctor but an older person might consider it being mobile and able to get out and about, being happy and having friends. In this component, you look at the factors that can have a positive or negative influence on a person’s health and wellbeing. You will learn to interpret physiological and lifestyle indicators, and what they mean for someone’s state of health. You will learn how to use this information to design an appropriate plan for improving someone’s health and wellbeing, including short- and long-term targets. Additionally, you will explore the difficulties an individual may face when trying to make these changes. You will develop skills in analysing information and communicating for a specific purpose, which will support your progression to Level 2 or 3 vocational or academic qualifications.

This component is assessed externally.

Key stage five students follow the new BTEC National extended certificate course and their studies will focus around:

Unit 1 – Human lifespan Development

Health and social care practitioners need to develop a knowledge base for working with people in every stage of their lives, and they need to know how their own experiences relate to health and wellbeing. Although it is generally accepted that there may be deterioration in health with age following adulthood, medical intervention means people are living longer and have better life prospects. This unit will develop your knowledge and understanding of patterns of human growth and development. You will explore the key aspects of growth and development, and the experience of health and wellbeing. You will learn about factors that can influence human growth, development and human health. Some of these are inherited and some are acquired through environmental, social or financial factors during our lifespan. You will learn about a number of theories and models to explain and interpret behaviour through the human lifespan. In this unit, you will explore the impact of both predictable and unpredictable life events, and recognise how they impact on individuals. You will study the interaction between the physical and psychological factors of the ageing process, and how this affects confidence and self-esteem, which in turn may determine how individuals will view their remaining years. This unit is externally assessed. It covers aspects of human growth and development through the different life stages. This content will serve as an introduction to health and social care needs and so will sit at the heart of the qualification.

Unit 5 – Meeting individual care and support needs

For you to be able to provide the care and support that individuals need, it is important that you have a good understanding of the principles behind providing quality care and support. This unit introduces you to the values and issues that need to be considered when planning care and support that meet the needs of an individual in a health and social care environment. In this unit, you will learn about the values and principles of meeting care and support needs and look at some of the ethical issues that arise when personalising care. You will examine factors that can impact the professionals who provide the care and support, and the challenges that must be overcome to allow access to good quality care and health services. You will explore the different methods used by professionals across all care services. You will reflect on these methods when you consider the importance of multi-agency working in providing a package of care and support that meets all the needs of individuals. To complete the assessment task within this unit, you will need to draw on your learning from across your programme. This unit will be useful if you are intending to pursue a career in social care or healthcare, for instance as a social worker or health visitors, practice nurse or occupational therapist. The unit will also be invaluable if you wish to progress to higher education, to degrees in areas such as health and social care management, social work and nursing.

Unit 11 – Psychological perspectives

An important aspect of working in the health and social care sector is to have a good understanding of the ways in which psychological development occurs in order to effectively meet the individual needs of service users. Having knowledge of the key concepts and ideas enables you to understand the ways in which development and behaviours occur. In this unit, you will learn about the different psychological perspectives that have been put forward and how these approaches have influenced thinking and practices in meeting and supporting service user needs. You will explore some key ideas that will give you a good understanding of how the mind develops, and the factors that influence development and behaviours. This knowledge is useful in developing your understanding of how these perspectives have formed the basis of different techniques to manage behaviours, and the therapeutic and other interventions used in the health and social care sector. These activities will help you gain the skills necessary for progression to higher education in many subject areas including psychology, health and social care, nursing and medical practice.

Unit 2 – Working in health and social care

This unit will help you to understand what it is like to work in the health and social care sector. When working for an organisation in this sector, you will have important responsibilities that you need to understand and carry out. These include maintaining the safety of and safeguarding individuals with health and social care needs, making sure that you properly handle their personal information and preventing discrimination towards them. You will need to understand how you will be accountable both to these individuals and the regulatory bodies that represent people who work in the health and social care sector. It is necessary for you to understand how your work will be monitored when you carry out a specific role such as nurse or social worker. You will begin by looking at the range of roles and general responsibilities of people who work in health and social care settings. You will learn about the organisations that provide services in this sector, and the different settings in which these services are delivered according to the needs of the service user. You will learn about the ways these services are provided and about the barriers that can prevent people from getting the services they need. As an employee of an organisation that provides services in the health and social care sector, you will have responsibilities towards people who seek information and advice, those who are being assessed and people who use services provided by or on behalf of your employer. You will also have responsibilities towards your employers, both as an employee and when you are undertaking specific duties on behalf of your employer. These organisations are regulated and inspected so you will also need to understand how inspectors and regulators monitor the work that you do. You will learn about working with people with specific needs, including ill health, learning disabilities, physical and sensory disabilities, and the needs of people who occupy different age categories. This unit will cover the skills you need to work in these areas of health and social care.