Social Studies

social-studies

Staff:

Faculty Leader: Jessica Sutheran

Leader of Geography: Kim Crickmore

Leader of Health and Social Care: Suzanne McKenzie

Teacher of Geography: Sarah Coleman

Teacher of Geography: John Child

Teacher of Geography: Elizabeth Mallett

Teacher of Geography: Alex Handy

Teacher of Social Studies: Ben Brown

Teacher of Social Studies: Beth Gaffer

Teacher of Sociology: John Inman

GEOGRAPHY CURRICULUM

CURRICULUM – KEY STAGE 3

Year 7

What topics will I learn in Year 7 Geography?

Autumn Term 1 Introduction to Geography: Geographical skills
Autumn Term 2 Impossible Places
Spring Term 1 Cracking coasts: Coasts
Spring Term 2 Geography of me
Summer Term 1 Finding Nemo enquiry
Summer Term 2 Rich vs. Poor

What Field Visits will I go on in Year 7 Geography?

In the summer term students are given the opportunity to visit the Sea Life centre in Birmingham to help them with their Finding Nemo enquiry.

Year 8

Autumn Term 1 Geography Adventures
Autumn Term 2 Brazil and the Olympics
Spring Term 1 Extreme weather
Spring Term 2 Population and migration enquiry
Summer Term 1 Geography at the movies
Summer Term 2 World resources

What Field Visits will I go on in Year 8 Geography?

In the autumn term Year 8 students are given the opportunity to visit the London Olympic park to compare and contrast in to the Brazil Olympic park, enabling students to draw on the best of both to create their own Olympic park.

Year 9

Autumn Term 1 Global issues
Autumn Term 2 Restless Earth: Earthquakes and volcanoes
Spring Term 1 Geography of Conflict
Spring Term 2 China
Summer Term 1 Intro to GCSE: ecosystems
Summer Term 2

What Field Visits will I go on in Year 9 Geography?

Natural History Museum

In the autumn term students are given the opportunity to visit the Natural History Museum in London. Students can use this to support their work on tectonics, ecosystems, rainforests and coral reefs.

CURRICULUM – KEY STAGE 4

 

AQA GCSE Geography

What will I learn?

Unit 1: Living with the physical environment

Students will build upon their key stage 3 knowledge by exploring:

  • Tectonic hazards e.g. volcanoes and earthquakes
  • Weather hazards e.g. hurricanes
  • Climate change
  • Ecosystems
  • Tropical rainforest
  • Hot deserts
  • UK’s coast and rivers

Unit 2: challenges in the human environment

Students will build upon their key stage 3 knowledge by exploring:

  • The urban world
  • Urban change in the UK e.g. Birmingham
  • Urban sustainability
  • The development gap (HIC and LIC)
  • Nigeria as a newly emerging economy (NEE)
  • The changing UK economy
  • Resource and energy management

Unit 3: Geographical application and skills

Students will complete two field work experiences. They will use this along with pre-release material issued around 6 weeks before the exam to answer paper 3.

for further information on exam assessment please visit:

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/geography/gcse/geography-8035/specification-at-a-glance

What Field Visits will I go on in GCSE Geography?

Spring Year 10 – Students will visit Birmingham for the day and explore the redevelopment of the city and whether the locals are happy with it.

Autumn Year 11 – Carding Mill Valley: Students complete a day’s river study in the Shropshire countryside. Here they will collect data to be used for their controlled assessment.

CURRICULUM – KEY STAGE 5 – AS AND A LEVEL

AQA AS and A-level

AS GEOGRAPHY

Physical Geography:

  • Water and carbon cycles
  • Hazards

Human Geography:

Geography fieldwork investigation:

for further information on exam assessment please visit:

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/geography/as-and-a-level/geography-7036/specification-at-a-glance

FULL A2 COURSE

Physical geography

Human geography

Geography fieldwork investigation

  • Fieldwork CAT

for further information on exam assessment please visit:

http://www.aqa.org.uk/subjects/geography/as-and-a-level/geography-7037/specification-at-a-glance

What Field Visits will I go on in GCE Geography?

Students are required to attend 4 days field work, 2 of which will be exploring regeneration in Birmingham and 2 exploring coastal processes in Norfolk.

SOCIOLOGY CURRICULUM

Sociology

Sociology is a social science that seeks to explore and explain society and social issues. Students will study a range of theories, structures, processes and issues that affect them and others in society. They will then go on to question for themselves different aspects of the social make-up of the UK. They will also be presented with opportunities to gain a wider understanding of the groups of people that make up Britain and the issues that affect them on a daily basis. Students will look at issues such as crime and deviance, education, mass media, family and social inequality and will consider question such as:

  • Why is there such a big divide between the rich and poor?
  • Who is most likely to succeed in education and why?
  • Who commits crime and why do they do it?
  • Does the media manipulate our views and indoctrinate us?

Students will study theories such as Marxism, Feminism and Functionalism and will take this further into A-level to consider other groups of sociologists such as Postmodernists and Neo- Marxists. These theories will give them perspectives to help answer some of the key questions and in which to gauge their own social perspective.

Students should also develop a range of important skills which will serve them both in their further academic study and in the workplace. The skills include empathy, collaboration, debating, understanding patterns, analysis of evidence and evaluation as they consider the strengths and weaknesses to arguments. They should also begin to make links between Sociology and other areas of study (particularly other social sciences such as Psychology).

Many of our GCSE students choose to continue Sociology at A-level and then into a Sociology or related subject degree.

Course overview

In years 10-11 GCSE students will follow the AQA course which comprises of:

4091: Unit 1 4092: Unit 2
Studying society

·         What is sociology?

·         How do we understand the languages that sociologists use?

·         What is a social structure?

·         What is a social process?

·         What is a social issue?

·         What is quantitative and qualitative research?

 

Education

·         Why do we have schools?

·         How do we measure educational success and failure?

·         What is the hidden curriculum?

·         What influences educational success beyond school?

·         Why is education a political issue?

 

Family

·         What is a family?

·         What is the conventional nuclear family?

·         Is marriage in decline?

·         What are the role relationships in the family and how do these change over time?

·         What are the alternatives to family?

 

 

Crime and Deviance

·         What is crime and deviance?

·         How do we measure the amount of criminal behaviour in society?

·         How do we explain criminal and deviant behaviour?

·         How do we attempt to control anti-social behaviour?

·         Who commits crime?

 

Mass media

·         What are the mass media?

·         Who owns the mass media?

·         What effect does the mass media have on society?

·         What are the media stereotypes?

·         What is the impact of the technological change?

 

Social inequality

·         What is social stratification?

·         What are life chances?

·         What barriers to achievement exist?

·         How is wealth distributed in Britain today?

·         What does it mean to be poor in Britain today?

 

 In year 12 AS Sociology students will follow the AQA course which comprises of:

Paper 1 – Education and methods in context Paper 2 – Family and research
·         Educational achievement and different social classes, genders and ethnic groups.

·         The function and purpose of the education system

·         Educational policy and inequality

·         Role of the education system

·         Internal and external factors

 

 

·         Researching education

 

·         The role of the family in society including Functionalism, Marxism, Feminism, The New Right

·         The nature of childhood.

·         Changes to the family, including divorce, marriage and cohabitation.

·         The domestic division of labour and power relationships

·         Demographic changes

·         Sociological perspectives on social policy

 

Sociological methods

·         How to use different research methods to investigate family and education.

·         Evaluation of such methods.

 

In yr 13 A-level students will be studying:

Paper 1: Education with theory and methods Paper 2: Topics in Sociology Paper 3: Crime and Deviance with theory and methods
Education

·         Educational achievement and different social classes, genders and ethnic groups.

·         The function and purpose of the education system

·         Educational policy and inequality

·         Role of the education system

·         Internal and external factors

 

 

·         Researching education

 

Family

·         The role of the family in society including Functionalism, Marxism, Feminism, The New Right

·         The nature of childhood.

·         Changes to the family, including divorce, marriage and cohabitation.

·         The domestic division of labour and power relationships

·         Demographic changes

·         Sociological perspectives on social policy

Beliefs in society

·         Theories of religion

·         Religion and social change

·         Secularisation

·         Religion, renewal and choice

·         Religion in a global context

·         Organisations, movements and members

·         Ideology and Science

 

 

Crime and Deviance

·         Functionalists, strain and subcultural

·         theories

·         Labelling theory and Interactionism

·         Marxists explanations for the cause of crime

·         in society

·         Realist theories on crime

·         Gender, crime and justice

·         Ethnicity, crime and justice

·         Crime and the media

·         Globalisation, green crime, human rights

·         and state crimes

·         Control punishment and victims

·         Suicide

 

Theory and methods

·         How to use different research methods

·         Evaluation of such methods.

·         Sociological theory

 

 

HEALTH AND SOCIAL CARE CURRICULUM

Health and Social Care:

Health and Social Care is a practical vocational subject which aims to prepare students for a career in specific Health and Social settings. If students are considering a career in Nursery nursing, care of the elderly or general nursing.

The aims of the courses are to encourage candidates to:

  • Develop and sustain an interest in health, early-years care and education, social care and issues affecting the care sector
  • Acquire knowledge and understanding of health, early-years care and education and issues affecting the health and social care sector
  • Develop skills that will enable them to make an effective contribution to the care sector including skills of research, evaluation and problem-solving in a work related context
  • Apply knowledge, understanding and skills
  • Prepare for further study and training.

Course Overview:

In year 10 the students have just started the new NQF BTEC first award and they will study:

Unit 1 (Lifespan and Development)

Learners will develop knowledge and

understanding about the different stages that people pass through in the course of life, and the common features related to these life stages.

Learners will also investigate the range of factors that affect human growth and

development, and how these are

interrelated. It may be useful for learners to work in small groups to look at how the different types of factors impact on people in different life stages. Groups could then share their findings.

 

Unit 2 (Care Values)

This unit provides learners with an

understanding of the values that underpin good practice in health and social care settings. Values in health and social care are not concepts that your learners are likely to be familiar with, but are an essential component for good practice when undertaking all roles in this sector.

 

Unit 3 (Communication)

This unit helps your learners to explore the communication skills needed to interact with individuals who use health and social care services.

Unit 6 (Nutrition Health and Wellbeing)

Learners will explore the effects of balanced and unbalanced diets on the health and wellbeing of individuals. Learners will need to explore the components of balanced and

unbalanced diets.

Learners will also need to demonstrate

understanding of the specific nutritional needs and preferences of individuals.

The current year 11 are following the QCF BTEC extended certificate which covers the following units:

Unit 1 (Communication)

1 Know different forms of communication

Contexts, Forms of communication, Alternative forms of communication

2 Understand barriers to effective communication

Communication cycle, Factors that affect communication,

Overcoming communication barriers

3 Be able to communicate effectively

Skills for effective communication

Unit 11 (Diet and Health).

1 Know dietary needs of individuals at different life stages

Life stages:

Concept of balanced diet, The balance of good health,

Components of a balanced diet, Carbohydrates, Proteins, Fats

and oils, Vitamins, Minerals, Diet variation during life stage

development, Babies, Children and adolescents, Adults,

Factors influencing the diet of individuals:

2 Understand effects of unbalanced diets on the health of

individuals

Medical conditions related to unbalanced diets:

3 Know specific dietary needs of service users

Conditions with specific dietary requirements, Religion/culture,

Two-day plan.

In year 12 and 13 students follow the OCR Applied A Level course:

Unit 910

Promoting quality care

Attitudes and prejudices

Rights and responsibilities of people who use services and providers

Facilitation of access to services

Values of care

How organisations promote quality care.

Unit 911

Communication in care settings

Types of communication

Factors that support and inhibit

communication

Communication skills

Theories relating to communication

Interaction with the person who uses

services(s)/practitioner(s).

Unit 912

Promoting good health

Principles of health and well-being

Preventative measures and job roles

Planning a health promotion campaign

Carry out a health promotion campaign.

Unit 919

Care practice and provision

 

Planning and provision of services

Effects of national policy and legislation on care practice and provision

How quality assurance is promoted by

services

Conducting a survey relating to quality

assurance

How services and practitioners meet

individual needs

Ways in which practitioners within services work in partnerships.

Unit 921

Anatomy and physiology in practice

Respiratory system

Cardio-vascular system

Digestive system

Reproductive system

Renal system

Musculo-skeletal and neural systems

Effects of lifestyle choices on body

systems and health and well-being.

Unit 923

Mental-Health issues

The concept of mental health

Types of mental illness

Causes of mental illness

Effects of mental illness

Preventative and coping strategies

Support for people with mental-health

needs.